Awesome Females #3

Why oh why oh why oh why oh why oh why oh why oh didn’t I get tickets??????????


Awesome Females #2

Karen O has always been awesome, since she exploded out of New York and was spat all over the world with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs she’s just done her own thing and not given a shit.  We’ve not had a true punk-rock mental goddess arguably since Patti Smith (who also makes my awesome female lists) and is probably the world’s most famous and most-liked front-woman to an alternative band to date (very hard mould to break, a very high glass ceiling to smash.)  Now a married lady, she may have calmed down somewhat, particularly in the song she wrote for Spike Jonze’s ‘Her’ titled the Moon song.  She’s got a solo album out which sounds like it might be all in the style of Ms laid-back O, but that doesn’t mean it sucks – I need to buy it.  I love Karen for her wildness and the fact her gender doesn’t even come into it for her and why should it?  She is the kind of girl I want as a friend and to do whiskey shots with.


Awesome Females #1

A new series including all the women I find inspirational and just so fucking cool.  Starting with Beth here, who I discovered somehow, through Instagram, I think.  I know she’s mates with SoKo the cat, who I was following first, although a bit annoying in the aspect she’s addicted to Instagram and posts-all-the-god-damn-time, whereas Beth is the cooler, Brit-side sister.

Despite being critically acclaimed a few years ago by much of the UK press (including NME and the guardian) and appearing on Later with Jools Holland Beth didn’t seem to go on to achieve the well-known status which I think she deserved.  Nevertheless she still seems to be enjoying herself through Instagram posts, (including a selfie with Selma Blair who she apparently shot a movie with last year) and is recording new music right now.


Kanye West – Bound 2

Err…  now I’m not going to lie; I am a fan of Kanye’s music.  In fact, I agree he has done a great deal for popular music since he’s came on the scene.  And in some way, I do think he’s a genius.

But, after watching this all I can say is… erm…?

So pulling in his wife/mother of his child into the video doesn’t just tug on the cheese factor, but having her practically topless, bobbing up and down on a motorbike in front of him, whilst spraying lyrics likes “I wanna fuck you hard on the sink” and “step back, can’t get spunk on the mink” feels a bit too personal.  Does it not?  Or just a tad bit “look how much we’re SO in LOVE with EACH OTHER!!“, whilst screaming the opposite.

It never works.  Look how much the world cringed when David and Victoria Beckham released those god awful pictures of them both; her looking as through she is orgasming by sprawling out on a car bonnet, and him, not even looking down at his spasming wife, just looking like a cold and boring stone statue instead.  Yeurgh!

wtf

 

I’m sorry Kanye.  Like I said, I love his music, although this song is a hard stretch to actually like, with it’s weird “uh huh honey” interruptions and lyrics, which instead of flowing into each other trickles painfully and slowly, brings me to ask, is Kim is Kanye’s Yoko Ono to John Lennon.

Hmm… (just saying.)  Your thoughts and comments please?

 

(Side note: another hilarious article from The Guardian’s Lost in Showbiz about the above, read if you fancy a giggle:  http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/lostinshowbiz/2013/nov/21/bound-2-kanye-west-kim-kardashian-music-video-love)


David Bowie – The Next Day

I’ve been away for a while, but just like David Bowie with The Next Day, I’ve unexpectedly returned…

davidbowie

It’s been 10 long, silent years for Bowie fans around the world without hearing any new material from their thin white duke.  Then, on his 66th birthday, a new single titled Where Are We Now? rippled through news channels and newspapers, marking somewhat of a return, albeit a very modest one.

(Just the simple act of wishing to share his music apparently lead to ‘The Next Day’s release, tours and interviews never had a second consideration.)

That first single perhaps cradled us falsely into believing the new album would be Bowie chilled out and in a dreamy reflection, which was possibly to lead us through a downplayed path.

But the first single of the album ‘The Next Day’ shatters previous perceptions with it’s punchy vocals, delivered with such energy, against a backdrop of wining guitars and an uninterrupted drum beat.  The curtain drops.

Despite his absence for 10 years nothing has escaped his voice, it’s still strong, it’s still Bowie.

Valentine’s Day is equally as satisfying in it’s guitar intro, whilst If You Can See Me shows Bowie hasn’t completely let go off his drum machine (glaringly obvious in his Drum and Bass phrase) but it has smoothed out, a little.

‘The Stars (Are Out Tonight)’, a gem on the album and particularly catchy for radio plays, rings bittersweet as a sweet melody accompanied with haunting lyrics.  “Stars are never sleeping, the dead ones and the living…” there’s no doubt this links to the curse of being a star, a Hollywood great, a musician, who finds no peace when fame finds them.  This is no surprise as Bowie grew increasingly jaded over his own years, decades, in the same spotlight, a man lost in time.

David Bowie_5

There’s also pockets of lyrics which pass comment on the present reality, shrouded and not direct, such as “training guns with men in the sand” on I’d Rather Be High, small leaks of personal opinion we’re not often given.

The second half of the album veers off into a looser direction, which makes the album sound like it hasn’t taken 10 years to make, or that time to have been trawled over, perfected, which may conjure mixed feelings from different reviews.

I cannot pinpoint pure vocals on the album either, without the same radio/crackling effect that’s been used on Bowie’s voice, which unfortunately verges on overused.

His stamp of unique pop music combined with electronic quirks and flourish, which no-one else has managed to pull off, still makes ‘The Next Day’ a very solid album.

An arguable point is what Bowie set to achieve with this album was not to achieve; just to share and play the music, a simple tune for a simpler time.